Our attention now turns to trees and woodland

 Our attention now turns to trees and woodland - 
The woodland season begins with an introduction to managing small wooded areas, with topics involving -
  • coppicing (practice and theory)
  • tools - bowsaw, billhook, axe
  • health and safety
  • biodiversity
  • species identification
  • 'crafting the woodland'
  • managing access
  • public relations
  • interpretation
This year's chosen coppicing plot at Highbury- 
The area was chosen because of the presence of hazel, previously cut around 10-15 years ago, poor ground flora, poor structure, some regeneration, including holly, rowan and cherry.

The aim is to improve species diversity by increasing light levels and introducing ground flora, such as bluebell, primrose, wild daffodil, red campion and wood melick.

Coppice - To cut

Coppicing is a traditional method of woodland management which takes advantage of the fact that many trees make new growth from the stump or roots if cut down. 


In a coppiced wood, which is called a copse, young tree stems are repeatedly cut down to near ground level. 


In subsequent growth years, many new shoots will emerge, and, after a number of years the coppiced tree, or stool, is ready to be harvested, and the cycle begins again. 


Pollarding is a similar process carried out at a higher level on the tree. (Wiki)







Comments