Eyes On The Ground - EOTG

A Birmingham & Black Country Wildlife Trust initiative to encourage the observation of wild flowers -

March hedgerow, bank and ditch at the Grove, Kings Heath. The oldest oak tree is around 150 years but the feature could date back to the Enclosure Act of 1772. A 'hidden history' of Kings Heath.
The term 'eyes on the ground' often has military connotations and has been conceptualised thus since the Iraqi war.

other definitions =
"The term "eyes on the ground" is occasionally used to describe those
individuals (frequently soldiers) who are close to an event and can
give first-hand information to decision makers." Google

or

""witnesses."  The Americanism "eyes on the ground" appears
to be military (or espionage) jargon for information obtained directly
("what they saw with their own eyes") as distinguished from
deductions, documentary information etc.   But the meaning is
simply witnesses." Google


Here's a link to a blog, exploring the concept further =

https://thebettereditor.wordpress.com/2014/05/31/if-your-eyes-are-on-the-ground-where-did-you-put-your-boots/


Our approach focuses on less sinister motives and encourages a 'walking pace' approach to life - a slow, very slow, walking pace at that. No dashing from here to there required - simple gentle grazing only.

Daffodils at Highbury
The season for EOTG began, for many, a couple of weeks ago, or perhaps earlier, when the snowdrops first poked an appearance. it's a bit like searching for a pinhole of light in a darkened place, such as a sweat lodge, odd analogy but never mind. The first sign that winter is subsiding and/or that Spring, warmth and light and food, is near.

This means a 'chance of survival' for many creatures, no time to lose in the search for an essential morsal - creatures with an adeptness for spotting the first bud or bug, behaviour becomes slightly frantic - feeding - establishing territory - attracting a mate. The song of Blackbirds and Thrushes have been my wake up call for the past 3 weeks.


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